Announcements

Our most popular posts in 2014

It’s an annual tradition around the world to ring in the new year by looking back over the old one, as the abundance of ‘best of 2014’ lists surely shows.  Here in the Watershed Management Division, as we conclude our first full year of blogging, we were curious to learn what caught the eye of you, our readers.

In 2014, we were followed by 200 readers in 80 countries and our top three posts were:

  1. Being Lake Wise

The Lake Wise program offers technical assistance to shoreland property owners who want to learn more about making their property as lake friendly as possible and awards property owners who are already utilizing best management practices.  If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to better manage your property for wildlife and water quality, the Lake Wise program is an excellent place to learn how.

  1. Who is taking the vital signs of “your” stream?

The Watershed Management Division tracks and evaluates the overall health of Vermont’s rivers and streams. With more than 7,000 miles of waterways, we couldn’t do it without the assistance of many volunteer organizations through the La Rosa Partnership Program.  Thank you so much for your monitoring efforts in 2014, and we look forward to working with you, and all of our volunteer monitors, in 2015.

  1. Aquatic Organism Passage through Bridges and Culverts

In the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene, our Rivers Program has partnered with VTrans and towns around Vermont to improve the ability of our transportation infrastructure to withstand flooding.  Making these changes offered opportunities to also consider the needs of the aquatic creatures relying on streams to move from place to place.  With thoughtful approaches to infrastructure repair and maintenance, we can make life better for people and wildlife.

Thanks for reading “Flow” – we wish you all a Happy New Year!

The Watershed Management Division uses statewide monitoring, permitting and planning to protect Vermont’s surface waters

The Watershed Management Division uses statewide monitoring, permitting and planning to protect Vermont’s surface waters